Autism and Developmental Delays

Vision Problems in Children with Sensory Processing Disorder

Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) affects a wide variety of people. Individuals with SPD and other different diagnoses or labels may have sensory issues such as sound sensitivity, difficulty screening out background noise, or visual sensitivity to fluorescent lights.

Optometry’s Role in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Many of the behavioral characteristics of those falling within the autism spectrum involve the visual system. Poor eye contact, staring at lights or spinning objects, looking askance, side viewing and general difficulties attending are often symptoms of visual dysfunction.

Vision Therapy Explored in Autism Magazine

In some cases, typical autistic behaviors like poor eye contact, looking through or beyond objects, extreme aversion to light, unusual reaction to sight, lack of reciprocal play, inordinate fear of heights or lack of appropriate fear of heights may be symptoms of visual problems that can be remediated with vision therapy.

Vision Therapy and the Autistic Child

Too often, visual problems which would have been detected early in non-disabled children go undiagnosed and untreated for children with disabilities, perhaps because the visual examination would be difficult, or the child is not able to verbalize a problem, or the school’s test showed “normal” 20/20 eyesight.

Temple Grandin, Ph.D, Speaks About Vision Problems in Autism

If visual processing problems are suspected, the child should see a developmental optometrist. This is a special eye doctor who can do therapy and exercises to help the processing problems that are inside the brain. In many of these children, the eye itself is normal but faulty wiring in the brain is causing the problem.

Roberto’s Story – A Parent’s Report

Before vision therapy Roberto struggled with reading and had trouble maintaining eye-contact. Prior to going to Alderwood Vision Therapy, he had seen other optometrists who indicated his eye-teaming issues might require surgery.

Report from Sensory Integration Quarterly

We did nor believe that our 12 year old son would tolerate wearing the glasses because he is very touch sensitive. As soon as his eye exam was over and the doctor told Jimmy to pick himself out a pair of glasses, he did it!

Autism And Vision – “Kyle And The Ripple Effect”

Normal autistic behaviors, such as: poor eye contact, looking though or beyond objects, extreme aversion to light, unusual reaction to sight, lack of reciprocal play, inordinate fear of heights or lack of appropriate fear of heights and stemming, could be visual symptoms.

Celebrate the Children: Alternative Visual Styles

CTC encompasses children with a wide array of developmental issues and alternative learning styles, and they have been widely recognized for their innovative approach to helping children on the Autistic Spectrum learn and thrive (as featured in a Time Magazine cover article).